Alabama Supreme Court elections

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See also: Partisan elections

There are nine justices on the Alabama Supreme Court, each elected to six-year terms. They appear on partisan election ballots statewide and must face re-election if they wish to serve again.[1] For more information about these elections, visit the Alabama judicial elections page.

The chief justice of the court is selected by popular vote, serving in that effect for his or her full six-year term.[1]

Qualifications

To serve on this court, a judge must be:

  • licensed to practice law for at least ten years;
  • a state resident for at least one year;
  • under the age of 70 at the time of election (judges who turn 70 in office may serve until their term expires)[1][2]

These specific requirements are fairly new; note in the History section below that the ten year law license requirement was only established in 2009.

Vacancies

Should a vacancy occur between regularly scheduled elections, which take place in November of even-numbered years, an interim justice is established via gubernatorial appointment. Any justice appointed in this fashion must then stand for election in the next general election occurring at least one year after the interim judge took office.[1]

Modifying this rule, the counties of Baldwin, Jefferson, Madison, Mobile, Talladega, and Tuscaloosa use judicial nominating commissions to fill vacancies. The governor chooses his or her appointee from a pool of the commission's nominees. Each county individually determines the size, composition, and procedures for its nominating commission.[1][3]

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See also: Alabama judicial elections, 2012

CandidateIncumbencyPartyPlacePrimary VoteElection Vote
GraddickCharles Graddick    NoRepublicanChief Justice25.5% 
MaloneCharles Malone    YesRepublican24.5% 
JonesDebra H. Jones    NoRepublicanPlace 134.8% 
PoynterGinger Poynter    NoIndependentn/aWithdrawn%   DefeatedD
MurdockGlenn Murdock   ApprovedAYesRepublicanPlace 398.16%   ApprovedA
LyonHarry Lyon    NoDemocraticChief Justicedisqualified%   DefeatedD
MainJames Allen Main   ApprovedAYesRepublicanPlace 498.13%   ApprovedA
StuartLyn Stuart   ApprovedAYesRepublicanPlace 298.13%   ApprovedA
MaddoxMelinda Lee Maddox    NoIndependentChief Justicen/a   DefeatedD
VanceRobert S. Vance    NoDemocraticChief Justice48.23%   DefeatedD
MooreRoy Moore   ApprovedANoRepublican49.9%ApprovedA51.76%   ApprovedA
BryanTommy Bryan   ApprovedANoRepublican65.1%ApprovedA98.07%   ApprovedA

In 2010, two incumbents were re-elected to the Alabama Supreme Court. Kelli Wise was elected the vacant seat left by Justice Patricia Smith.[4]

Candidate Incumbent SeatPartyElection votes Election %
Kelli Wise ApprovedA No Place 1Republican912,254 62.9%
Rhonda Chambers No Place 1Democratic537,112 37%
Candidate Incumbent SeatPartyElection votes Election %
Michael Bolin ApprovedA Yes Place 2Republican907,029 62.7%
Tracy W. Cary No Place 2Republican
Candidate Incumbent SeatPartyElection votes Election %
Tom Parker ApprovedA Yes Place 3Republican849,106 58.9%
Mac Parsons No Place 3Democratic591,133 41%
James R. Houts No Place 3Republican
Eric Johnston No Place 3Republican

Harold See retired from the court, leaving an open seat.[5]

Candidate Incumbent SeatPartyElection votes Election %
Greg Shaw ApprovedA No Republican1,021,371 50.3%
Deborah Bell Paseur No Democratic1,008,479 49.6%

Democrat Sue Bell Cobb was elected Chief Justice of the Alabama Supreme Court, defeating appointed Chief Justice Drayton Nabers, Jr. Glenn Murdock was also elected to the court in 2006, defeating incumbent Justice Jean Brown.

Incumbent Justices Thomas Woodall and Lyn Stuart were re-elected in 2006, after each fending off primary and general election challenges. Justice Champ Lyons was re-elected after running unopposed in the general election.[6][7]

Candidate Incumbent SeatPartyElection votes Election %
Sue Bell Cobb ApprovedA No Chief JusticeDemocratic634,494 51.5%
Drayton Nabers, Jr. Yes Chief JusticeRepublican596,237 48.4%
Tom Parker No Chief JusticeRepublican
Candidate Incumbent SeatPartyPrimary votesPrimary %Election votes Election %
Champ Lyons ApprovedA Yes Place 1Republican60.3%220,886
Ben Hand No Place 1Republican39.6%145,105
Candidate Incumbent SeatPartyPrimary votesPrimary %Election votes Election %
Thomas Woodall ApprovedA Yes Place 2Republican253,73271.6%665,610 56.7%
Gwendolyn Thomas Kennedy No Place 2Democratic506,691 43.2%
Hank Fowler No Place 2Republican28.3%100,565
Candidate Incumbent SeatPartyPrimary votesPrimary %Election votes Election %
Lyn Stuart ApprovedA Yes Place 3Republican267,20171.7%680,103 57.8%
Albert Johnson No Place 3Democratic495,846 42.1%
Alan Zeigler No Place 3Republican28.2%105,288
Candidate Incumbent SeatPartyPrimary votesPrimary %Election votes Election %
Glenn Murdock ApprovedA No Place 4Republican219,59461.1%651,057 54.9%
John England No Place 4Democratic532,837 45%
Tracy Gwyn BirdSong No Place 4Republican44,26212.3%6
Jean Brown Yes Place 4Republican95,28726.5%

The removal of Chief Justice Roy Moore from the Alabama Supreme Court was a substantial campaign issue in the Republican primaries of 2004. Regardless of that situation, Alabama voters still elected three Republicans to open seats over the choice of sending Democrats to the court.[8]

Republicans Tom Parker, Patricia Smith and Michael Bolin were all elected to the court after facing challenges in Republican primaries and the general election. [9][10]

Candidate Incumbent SeatPartyPrimary votesPrimary %Election votes Election %
Tom Parker ApprovedA No Place 1Republican107,32550.9%986,530 55.8%
Robert H. Smith No Place 1Democratic781,197 44.1%
Jean Brown Yes Place 1Republican103,24149%
Candidate Incumbent SeatPartyElection votes Election %
Patricia Smith ApprovedA No Place 2Republican1,070,789 59.9%
Roger M. Monroe No Place 2Democratic716,691 40%
Pam Baschab No Place 2Republican
Candidate Incumbent SeatPartyPrimary votesPrimary %Election votes Election %
Michael Bolin ApprovedA No Place 3Republican99,96449.9%1,056,642 59.7%
John E. Rochester No Place 3Democratic712,569 40.2%
Peggy Givhan No Place 3Republican34,32817.1%
(No first name given) Holloway No Place 3Republican13,9136.9%

Harold See was re-elected to the court in 2002.[11]

Candidate Incumbent SeatPartyElection votes Election %
Harold See ApprovedA Yes Republican676,539 51.4%
James H. Anderson No Democratic609,490 46.3%
Tom Bear No Libertarian29,247 2.2%

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See also

External links

References

Alabama Supreme CourtAlabama Court of Civil AppealsAlabama Court of Criminal AppealsAlabama Circuit CourtsAlabama Municipal CourtsAlabama Probate CourtsAlabamaAlabama countiesAlabama judicial newsAlabama judicial electionsJudicial selection in AlabamaUnited States District Court for the Northern District of AlabamaUnited States District Court for the Middle District of AlabamaUnited States District Court for the Southern District of AlabamaUnited States Court of Appeals for the Eleventh CircuitAlabamaTemplate.jpg