Jeanette Kathleen Doran

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Jeanette Kathleen Doran
Jeanette-Kathleen-Doran.jpg
Current Court Information:
Title:   Former judicial candidate
Personal History
Party:   Republican
Undergraduate:   Auburn University
Law School:   Campbell University School of Law
Candidate 2014:
Candidate for:  Supreme Court
Position:  Hudson Seat
State:  North Carolina
Election information 2014:
Incumbent:  No
Primary date:  5/6/2014
Primary vote:  20.9%DefeatedD

Jeanette Kathleen Doran was a 2014 candidate for the North Carolina Supreme Court.[1]

Education

Doran received her B.A. from Auburn University and her J.D. from the Campbell University School of Law.[2]

Career

Doran began her career as a law clerk for the U.S. District Court for the Middle District of North Carolina and then as a research and writing attorney for the appeals section of the federal public defender's office. In 2004, she joined the staff of the School of Government at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill. The following year, she joined the North Carolina Institute for Constitutional Law as a staff attorney. In 2011, she became the institute's executive director. According to her campaign website, in that position she worked to "enforce constitutional restrictions on government spending and public debt," among other things.[3] The News & Observer wrote that the institute is backed by the state's budget director Art Pope, who they call a "leading funder of conservative groups and candidates."[4] Doran was appointed to serve as chairperson of the North Carolina Board of Review by Gov. Pat McCrory in December of 2013.[3]

Elections

2014

For in-depth coverage of the state's high court races, see: North Carolina Supreme Court elections, 2014
Jeanette Doran appearing before the Randolph Tea Party
See also: North Carolina judicial elections, 2014
Doran ran for election to the North Carolina Supreme Court.
Primary: She was defeated in the primary on May 6, 2014, receiving 20.9% of the vote. She competed against incumbent Robin Hudson and Eric Lee Levinson.[1]
VOTE.png

This was the only supreme court race in North Carolina that included a primary election. With two Republican candidates--Levinson and Doran--in the primary, voter turnout from that party was expected to be high. It was speculated that a high Republican turnout could counteract Hudson's incumbent advantage. However, after election night, it was reported that Democrats accounted for approximately 42% of the voters, while Republicans represented only about 31%.[5][6]

Political affiliation

Though North Carolina judicial elections are technically nonpartisan, the political preferences of supreme court candidates are widely known. Doran is regarded as a Republican candidate and has been endorsed by a group called N.C. Experienced Conservative Judges.[2]

Judicial philosophy

Jeanette Doran's campaign website states, regarding her judicial philosophy:

Jeanette believes the constitution is the cornerstone of all law. She believes in judicial restraint and in enforcing statutes as written.[7]

—Jeanette Doran's campaign[3]

Doran also states, on her campaign website:

As a lawyer, I understand the importance of our founding principles and the unique role of the courts. As a mom, I have a special motivation to ensure the law is fairly, justly and consistently applied.[7]

—Jeanette Doran[3]

The website adds that Doran is "[k]nown in conservative circles for her explanation of the hidden taxes and new bureaucracies created by Obamacare."[3]

See also

External links

References

North CarolinaSupreme Court of North CarolinaNorth Carolina Court of AppealsNorth Carolina Superior CourtsNorth Carolina District CourtsUnited States District Court for the Eastern District of North CarolinaUnited States District Court for the Middle District of North CarolinaUnited States District Court for the Western District of North CarolinaUnited States Court of Appeals for the Fourth CircuitNorth Carolina countiesNorth Carolina judicial newsNorth Carolina judicial electionsJudicial selection in North CarolinaNorthCarolinaTemplatewithoutBankruptcy.jpg