Judicial selection in Alabama

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Judicial selection in the states
Judicial selection in Alabama
Seal of the Alabama court system.jpg
Alabama Supreme Court
Method:   Partisan election of judges
Term:   6 years
Alabama Court of Civil Appeals
Method:   Partisan election of judges
Term:   6 years
Alabama Court of Criminal Appeals
Method:   Partisan election of judges
Term:   6 years
Alabama Circuit Courts
Method:   Partisan election of judges
Term:   6 years
Alabama District Courts
Method:   Partisan election of judges
Term:   6 years
Alabama Probate Courts
Method:   Partisan election of judges
Term:   6 years

Judicial selection in Alabama is largely a process of partisan elections.

Supreme Court

The nine justices of the Alabama Supreme Court are elected in partisan elections to six-year terms on the court.

Should a vacancy occur between regularly scheduled elections, which take place in November of even-numbered years, an interim justice is appointed via gubernatorial appointment. Any justice appointed in this fashion must then stand for election in the next general election that occurs one year or more after beginning the interim appointment.

Justices of the Supreme Court are elected statewide and may reside anywhere in the state.

All justices must be licensed to practice law in the state of Alabama.

Civil and Criminal Appeals courts

The judges on the Court of Civil Appeals and Court of Criminal Appeals are elected in partisan elections to six-year terms. Judges must stand for re-election every six years.[1]

Judges of the Civil Appeals and Criminal Appeals courts are elected statewide and may reside anywhere in the state.

Municipal courts

Municipal court judges are not elected to office. They are appointed by the governing body of the municipality. Full-time municipal court judges are appointed for four-year terms, while part-time municipal judges are appointed for two-year terms.

Vacancies in municipal court positions are filled by appointments made by the municipal governing bodies.[2]

Nominating commissions

Judicial nominating commissions are used to fill vacancies in Baldwin, Jefferson, Madison, Mobile, Talladega, and Tuscaloosa counties. Each county determines the size, composition, and procedures for its nominating commission.[3]

Changes in selection

1819

In 1819, all judges in the stated were elected for life (contingent on "good behavior") by votes of the state legislature.[4]

1830

In 1830, while judges were still chosen by the state legislature, they were now elected for six-year terms rather than for life.[4]

1850

Starting in 1850, the state went to a system of electing circuit court judges in popular elections.[4]

1867

In 1867, the law changed so that judges at all levels in the state were elected by popular vote.[4]

See also

External links

References

Alabama Supreme CourtAlabama Court of Civil AppealsAlabama Court of Criminal AppealsAlabama Circuit CourtsAlabama Municipal CourtsAlabama Probate CourtsAlabamaAlabama countiesAlabama judicial newsAlabama judicial electionsJudicial selection in AlabamaUnited States District Court for the Northern District of AlabamaUnited States District Court for the Middle District of AlabamaUnited States District Court for the Southern District of AlabamaUnited States Court of Appeals for the Eleventh CircuitAlabamaTemplate.jpg