Electionbuttonsnowords.png
Read this week's JP Election Brief:
Primary match-ups across the nation



Judicial selection in New Hampshire

From Judgepedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Judicial selection in the states
Judicial selection in New Hampshire
Seal of New Hampshire.png
New Hampshire Supreme Court
Method:   Comm-selection, Gov. nomination with appointment after vote of executive council
Term:   Until age 70
New Hampshire Superior Court
Method:   Comm-selection, Gov. nomination with appointment after vote of executive council
Term:   Until age 70
New Hampshire District Court
Method:   Comm-selection, Gov. nomination with appointment after vote of executive council
Term:   Until age 70
New Hampshire Probate Courts
Method:   Comm-selection, Gov. nomination with appointment after vote of executive council
Term:   Until age 70

Judicial selection in New Hampshire involves input from three different groups. These include: the New Hampshire Judicial Selection Commission, the Governor and the New Hampshire Executive Council.

The judicial selection commission reviews applicants for judicial vacancies on the courts. The commission provides a list of recommended candidates to the Governor. The Governor nominates one candidate from the list to fill a judicial vacancy. The nominee must be approved and appointed to the position by the Executive Council.

Judicial selection commission

In 2013, Governor Maggie Hassan established the commission with Executive Order 2013-6. The commission was created to recommend qualified judicial candidates for the Governor to nominate for judicial vacancies. Between nine and eleven members serve on the commission. All members are appointed by the Governor and serve terms of three years. Members may serve additional terms, if invited to do so by the Governor. Each executive council district is represented on the commission.[1]

Executive council

The New Hampshire Executive Council serves an important role in the judicial selection process in the state. The state constitution explains the powers and duties of the executive council. Council members are chosen every two years in partisan elections. The council consists of five members which advise the Governor in several policy areas. One of these includes appointing judges, commissioners and justices of the peace.[2]

Supreme court

Justices of the New Hampshire Supreme Court are appointed to terms that last until the mandatory retirement age of 70 using the method referenced above. When there is a vacancy on the court, the Governor makes a nomination from the list submitted by the selection commission. The executive council must then vote to approve the nomination and make the appointment. The chief justice of the court serves a term of five years, or until the age of 70. The chief justice position is filled using the same selection process. No qualifications are specified for justices or the chief justice of the supreme court, but the mandatory retirement age is 70.[3]

Superior court

The selection process for judges serving on the superior court is the same as that used for the supreme court. However, the chief judge for each superior court may serve until the age of 70. Terms for judges on the superior courts also expire when a judge reaches the mandatory retirement age of 70.[3]

Limited jurisdiction courts

These courts include the district courts and probate courts. Judges are selected to serve on these courts in the same manner as judges on the supreme court and superior courts. There are no specific qualifications for probate court judges, however, district court judges must be members of the state bar. The mandatory retirement age for judges on these courts is also 70.

See also

External links

References

New HampshireNew Hampshire Supreme CourtNew Hampshire Superior CourtsNew Hampshire Circuit CourtsNew Hampshire Probate CourtsNew Hampshire District CourtNew Hampshire Family DivisionUnited States District Court for the District of New HampshireUnited States Court of Appeals for the First CircuitNew Hampshire countiesNew Hampshire judicial newsNew Hampshire judicial electionsJudicial selection in New HampshireNewHampshireTemplatewithoutBankruptcy.jpg