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Judicial selection in New York

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Judicial selection in the states
Judicial selection in New York
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New York Court of Appeals
Method:   Comm. select., Gov. appt. with Senate confirmation
Term:   13 years
New York Supreme Court, Appellate Division
Method:   Comm. select., Gov. appt.
Term:   5 years or end of Supreme Court term
New York Supreme Court
Method:   Partisan elections
Term:   14 years
New York County Courts
Method:   Partisan elections
Term:   10 years
New York Town and Village Courts
Method:   Partisan elections
Term:   4 years

Court of Appeals

Justices of the New York Court of Appeals are appointed to 14 year terms by gubernatorial appointment from a nominating commission with consent of the senate.[1]

If a vacancy on the court occurs, gubernatorial appointment from a nominating commission with consent of the senate is required.[1]

The chief justice of the court serves a fourteen year term and is elected by gubernatorial appointment from a nominating commission with consent of the senate.[1]

In order to join the court, an individual must meet the following qualifications:[1]

  • be a state resident;
  • have had state practice > 10 years;
  • retire at the mandatory age of 70 years old

Supreme Court, Appellate Division

Justices of the New York Supreme Court, Appellate Division are appointed to 5 year terms or through the end of a supreme court term, whichever term is the shorter one. Justices are selected through gubernatorial appointment from a nominating commission. The justices of the appellate division are chosen from all the justices elected to the supreme court.[1]

If a vacancy on the court occurs, gubernatorial appointment from a nominating commission is required.[1]

The chief justice of the court serves through the end of a supreme court term and is elected by gubernatorial appointment from a nominating commission.[1]

In order to join the court, an individual must meet the following qualifications:[1]

  • be a state resident;
  • have had state practice > 10 years;
  • be the minimum age of 18;
  • retire at the mandatory retirement age of 70.

Supreme Court

Justices of the New York Supreme Court are elected to 14 year terms through partisan election. The candidates are all chosen at partisan nominating conventions.[1]

If a vacancy on the court occurs, gubernatorial appointment from a nominating commission is required.[1]

The position of chief justice is chosen by the chief administrative judge of New York, who appoints one deputy chief administrative judge to supervise and look over all of the trial courts of New York City and one to supervise trial courts outside the limits of New York City. These administrative judges are also assigned in each judicial district and in each of New York's major courts.[1]

In order to join the court, an individual must meet the following qualifications:[1]

  • be a state resident;
  • have had state practice > 10 years;
  • be the minimum age of 18;
  • retire at the mandatory retirement age of 70.

Civil and Criminal Courts of New York City

Judges of these courts are elected in partisan elections to ten-year terms.[2]

County Courts

All aspects of the New York County Courts are the same as the New York Supreme Court, excluding the justices of the New York County Courts being elected to 10-year terms by partisan election.[1]

In order to join the court, an individual must meet the following qualifications:[1]

  • be a state resident;
  • be a county resident;
  • have had state practice > 5 years;
  • be the minimum age of 18;
  • retire at the mandatory retirement age of 70.

Family Courts

Family Court judges outside of New York City are elected to ten-year terms, while those in the City are appointed by the Mayor to ten-year terms.[2]

Surrogates' Courts

Judges of the New York Surrogates' Courts are elected to ten-year terms outside of New York City, and fourteen-year terms in New York City's counties.

City Courts

City Court judges, outside of New York City, are elected or appointed. Full-time judges serve ten-year terms, while part-time judges serve six-year terms.[2]

Town and Village Courts

Town and Village Court judges are elected to four year terms.[3]

Court of Claims

Court of Claims judges are appointed by the governor and must be confirmed by the senate.[4]

Terms

The terms of elected judges begin and end on January 1st.[5]

History of judicial selection

In 1846, New York became the second state to adopt popular elections for its judges.[6]

See also

External links

References

New YorkUnited States District Court for the Eastern District of New YorkUnited States District Court for the Western District of New YorkUnited States District Court for the Northern District of New YorkUnited States District Court for the Southern District of New YorkUnited States bankruptcy court, Eastern District of New YorkUnited States bankruptcy court, Western District of New YorkUnited States bankruptcy court, Northern District of New YorkUnited States bankruptcy court, Southern District of New YorkUnited States Court of Appeals for the Second CircuitNew York Court of AppealsNew York Supreme Court, Appellate DivisionNew York Supreme CourtNew York County CourtsNew York City CourtsNew York Town and Village CourtsNew York Family CourtsNew York Surrogates' CourtsNew York City Civil CourtNew York City Criminal CourtsNew York Court of ClaimsNew York Problem Solving CourtsNew York countiesNew York judicial newsNew York judicial electionsJudicial selection in New YorkNewYorkTemplate.jpg