Judicial selection in Vermont

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Judicial selection in the states
Judicial selection in Vermont
Seal of Vermont.png
Vermont Supreme Court
Method:   Comm. select., Gov. appt. with Senate confirmation
Term:   6 years
Vermont Superior Court
Method:   Comm. select., Gov. appt. with Senate confirmation
Term:   6 years
Vermont District Courts
Method:   Comm. select., Gov. appt. with Senate confirmation
Term:   6 years
Vermont Probate Division
Method:   Partisan elections
Term:   4 years

Judicial selection in Vermont provides that justices and judges are chosen through a commission selection/political appointment process. Once appointed, they must stand for a retention vote in the general assembly at the end of their term.[1]

Supreme court

Justices of the Vermont Supreme Court are appointed by the governor, after the Vermont Judicial Nominating Commission recommends candidates. All appointments are confirmed by the senate. Justices serve six-year terms and then stand for a retention election in the general assembly. Interim vacancies are filled in the same way, but these judges must stand for retention at the end of the unexpired term. The chief justice of the court serves a six-year term and is also chosen by the governor, based upon recommendations made by the nominating commission, with confirmation by the Vermont General Assembly. In order to serve on the court, candidates must meet these qualifications:

  • practice law or serve as a judge in the state for more than five of the last ten years;
  • be under 70 years of age.[1]

Judges serving on the supreme court must retire at the end of the year in which they turn 70.[1]

Superior court

The selection of the judges for the superior courts is the same as for the supreme court, with one exception. The administrative judge of the court is appointed by the supreme court and serves a four-year term.[1]

Assistant judges who serve on this court are appointed to six-year terms. They must then stand for a retention vote in the general assembly when their term expires. Assistant judges who reach the mandatory retirement age of 70 during their term, may serve the remainder of their term.[1]

District courts

Judges on the district courts are selected the same way as judges on the superior courts. The rules for assistant judges serving on this court are also the same.[1]

Probate division

Judges serving in the probate division are elected in partisan elections and serve 4-year terms. Elections are held to fill interim vacancies. If a judge reaches mandatory retirement age during their term, they may serve the remainder of their term.[1]

See also

External links

References