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United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit

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District of Columbia Circuit
Court of Appeals
US-CourtOfAppeals-DCCircuit-Seal.png
Chief:Merrick GarlandJudges:11
Posts:11Vacancies:0
Active judges
BrownGriffithHendersonKavanaughMillettPillardRogersSrinivasanTatelWilkins
Senior Judges
BuckleyEdwardsGinsburgRandolphSentelleSilbermanWilliams
Former Judges
Key:
(Numbers indicate % of seats vacant.)
0%0%-10%
10%-25%25%-40%
More than 40%
Contents
1 Court
1.1 Vacancy warning level
1.2 Jurisdiction
1.2.1 Cases heard
1.2.2 Case load
1.3 Clerk's office
1.4 History
1.4.1 Court history
1.4.2 Judicial posts
1.4.3 Notable decisions
1.4.4 Federal courthouse
1.5 See also
1.6 External links
1.7 References
2 Judges

The United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit, known informally as the D.C. Circuit, is the federal appellate court for the United States District Court for the District of Columbia. Appeals from the D.C. Circuit, as with all the U.S. Courts of Appeals, are heard on a discretionary basis by the Supreme Court. It should not be confused with the District of Columbia Court of Appeals, which is roughly equivalent to a state supreme court in the District of Columbia, or with the Federal Circuit, whose jurisdiction is limited only by subject matter. The court was established in 1893 and currently has a total of 11 seats. The court is located at the E. Barrett Prettyman Federal Courthouse in Washington, D.C.

Vacancy warning level

Currently the vacancy warning level for the District of Columbia Circuit is set at green. The court currently has no vacancies out of its 11 total seats.

Jurisdiction

The United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit has appellate jurisdiction over cases heard by the United States District Court for the District of Columbia. The Court is located in the E. Barrett Prettyman United States Courthouse and William B. Bryant Annex in Washington, D.C.

Cases heard

The District of Columbia Circuit has appellate jurisdiction over cases heard in one of its subsidiary districts. These cases can include civil and criminal matters that fall under federal law. Because of the nature of its jurisdiction, the ideologies of the judges who serve on the District of Columbia Circuit is often a partisan issue.[1]

Case load

Federal Court Case Load Statistics*
YearStarting case load:Cases filed:Total cases:Cases terminated:Remaining casesTerminations on merits:Terminations on ProcedureCross Appeals:Total Terminations: Written decisions per Judge**
201213111193250411891315488468233118952
201112931132242511131312546398169111355
201013051178248311891294520435234118953
200915721097266913611308561586214136156
200815501307285712851572557510218128551
200715491310285913091550541561207130949
200614631281274411951549584457154119558
*All statistics are taken from the Official Federal Courts' Website (for District Courts) and reflect the calendar year through September.    **This statistic reflects only judges that are active for the entire 12 month period.

Clerk's office

The official Clerk of Court is Mark Langer. The Office is open for filing from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday, excluding Federal holidays. Office closing due to inclement weather is announced on the Clerk's official phone line, at (202) 216-7000 and (202) 216-7296 and is also announced on the following stations:WRC (Channel 4), WTTG (Channel 5), WJLA-TV (Channel 7), and WUSA (Channel 9).

United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia
E. Barrett Prettyman United States Courthouse
333 Constitution Avenue, N.W.
Washington D.C., DC 20001
202-216-7000

History

Court history

The United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit was established on February 9, 1893, by 27 Stat. 434 which granted the court one chief justice position and two associate justice seats. Over the years, eight additional seats were added resulting in a total of 11 posts.[2]

Judicial posts

The following table highlights the development of judicial posts for the Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit:

Year Statute Total Seats
February 9, 1893 27 Stat. 434 3
June 19, 1930 46 Stat. 785 5
May 31, 1938 52 Stat. 584 6
August 3, 1949 63 Stat. 493 9
October 20, 1978 92 Stat. 1629 11
July 10, 1984 98 Stat. 333 12
January 7, 2008 121 Stat. 2534 11
[3]

Notable cases

For a search-able list of decisions from the D.C. Circuit, please see:
D.C. Circuit Searchable Opinions


Federal courthouse

The United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit shares the E. Barrett Prettyman Federal Courthouse with the United States District Court for the District of Columbia.

Historical Significance

The land for the court house was originally obtained by the U.S. government for the creation of the District of Columbia. It was originally assigned to hold the U.S. Mint but was later changed when the Mint remained in Philadelphia. The site was sold by the U.S. government on May 7, 1822, and developed as a commercial and residential district. The current court building was commissioned in 1949 to local architect Louis Justement for his original building plans. In August of 1949, ground was broken and the building was finally opened in 1952. In March 1977, the courthouse was renamed the E. Barrett Prettyman Courthouse. Prettyman was a judge for the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit from 1945-1971.[8] To read the full history of the court building, see the Official Courthouse History.

Visiting the court

  • Hours: 9:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. Monday through Friday, except holidays.

The court is located on 333 Constitution Avenue Northwest in Washington, D.C.[9] The court is accessible through the Judiciary Square or Archives-Navy Memorial-Penn Quarter Metro stations.[10]

The court bans visitors from bringing liquids, aerosols, and gels that are in excess of 3.4 ounces into the building. Visitors are allowed to carry into the courthouse up to three liquid containers weighing 3.4 ounces or less. The policy has been in effect since April 5, 2010.[11] Building tenants, judges, court staff, and jurors with their jury summons are exempt from the ban.[11]

The court also provides counsel an array of technological devices that are equipped in most courtrooms.[12]

See also

External links

References

District of Columbia Circuit
Court of Appeals
US-CourtOfAppeals-DCCircuit-Seal.png
Chief:Merrick GarlandJudges:11
Posts:11Vacancies:0
Active judges
BrownGriffithHendersonKavanaughMillettPillardRogersSrinivasanTatelWilkins
Senior Judges
BuckleyEdwardsGinsburgRandolphSentelleSilbermanWilliams
Former Judges
Key:
(Numbers indicate % of seats vacant.)
0%0%-10%
10%-25%25%-40%
More than 40%
Contents
1 Court
2 Judges
2.1 Active Judges
2.1.1 Article III judges
2.1.2 Pending appointments
2.1.3 Senior judges
2.2 Past judges
2.2.1 Former Chief judges
2.2.2 Former judges

Active judges

Article III judges

JudgeBornHomeAppointed byActiveChiefPreceededBachelorsLaw
Judge Janice Brown1949Greenville, ALW. Bush 6/10/2005 - PresentStephen F. WilliamsCalifornia State U. '74U. of California Los Angeles Law '77
Chief Judge Merrick Garland1952IllinoisClinton 3/20/1997 - Present2/12/13 - PresentAbner MikvaHarvard '74Harvard Law '77
Judge Thomas Griffith1954Yokohama, JapanW. Bush 6/29/2005 - PresentPatricia WaldBrigham Young U. '78U. of Virginia Law '85
Judge Karen Henderson1944Oberlin, OHH.W. Bush 7/5/1990 - PresentKenneth StarrDuke U. '66U. of North Carolina Law '69
Judge Brett Kavanaugh1965Washington D.C.W. Bush 5/29/2006 - PresentLaurence SilbermanYale '87Yale Law '90
Judge Judith Rogers1939New York, NYClinton 3/11/1994 - PresentClarence ThomasRadcliffe College '61Harvard Law '64
Judge David Tatel1942Washington D.C.Clinton 10/7/1994 - PresentRuth Bader GinsburgU. of Michigan '63U. of Chicago Law '66
Judge Robert Leon Wilkins1963IndianaObama 1/13/2014-PresentDavid SentelleRose-Hulman Inst. of Tech., B.S., 1986Harvard Law, J.D., 1989
Judge Srikanth Srinivasan1967Chandigarh, India,
and Lawrence, KS
Obama 5/23/2013 - PresentArthur RandolphStanford U., B.A., 1989Stanford U. Law, J.D., 1995
Judge Patricia Ann Millett1963Dexter, MaineObama 12/10/2013 - PresentJohn G. Roberts, Jr.U. of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, B.A., 1985Harvard Law, J.D. 1988
Judge Cornelia T. L. Pillard1961Washington D.C.Obama 12/12/2013 - PresentDouglas GinsburgYale College, B.A., 1983Harvard Law, J.D., 1987

Pending appointments

There are no current pending appointments for the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit.


Senior judges

JudgeAppointed byActiveChiefSeniorBachelorsLaw
Senior judge Stephen F. WilliamsReagan 6/16/1986 - 9/30/20089/30/2008 - PresentYale U. '58Harvard Law '61
Senior Judge David SentelleReagan 9/11/1987 - 2/12/20132008-20132/12/2013 - PresentU. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill '65U. of North Carolina Law '68
Senior Judge Douglas GinsburgReagan 10/14/1986 - 10/14/20112001-200810/14/2011 - PresentCornell'70U. of Chicago Law '73
Senior judge Harry EdwardsCarter 2/20/1980 - 11/3/20051994-200111/3/2005 - PresentCornell U. '62U. of Michigan Law '65
Senior judge Arthur RandolphH.W. Bush 7/16/1990 - 11/1/200811/1/2008 - PresentDrexel U. '66U. of Pennsylvania Law '69
Senior judge Laurence SilbermanReagan 10/28/1985 - 11/1/200011/1/2000 - PresentDartmouth '57Harvard Law '61
Senior judge James BuckleyReagan 12/17/1985 - 8/31/19968/31/1996 - PresentYale '43Yale Law '49


Past judges

Former Chief judges

Former Chief JudgesTerm
Patricia Wald1986-1991
Elijah Prettyman1958-1960
Abner Mikva1991-1994
Carl McGowan1981
David Bazelon1962-1978
Wilbur Miller1960-1962
Spottswood Robinson1981-1986
James Wright1978-1981
Harry Edwards1994-2001
Douglas Ginsburg2001-2008
David Sentelle2008-2013
Henry Edgerton1955-1958
Harold Montelle Stephens1948-1955
George Ewing Martin1924-1937
Duncan Groner1937-1948
Constantine Joseph Smyth1917-1924
Seth Shepard1905-1917
Richard Henry Alvey1893-1905
William Cranch1806-1855

In order to qualify for the office of Chief Judge in one of the federal courts, a judge must have been in active service on the court for at least one year, be under the age of 65, and have not previously served as Chief Judge. A vacancy in the office of Chief Judge is filled by the judge highest in seniority among the group of qualified judges. The Chief Judge serves for a term of seven years or until age 70, whichever occurs first. The age restrictions are waived if no members of the court would otherwise be qualified for the position. Unlike the Chief Justice of the United States, a Chief Judge returns to active service after the expiration of his or her term and does not create a vacancy on the bench by the fact of his or her promotion.[1][2]


Former judges

  1. William Cranch
  2. James Markham Marshall
  3. Allen Bowie Duckett
  4. Nicholas Battalle Fitzhugh
  5. William Kilty
  6. James Sewall Morsell
  7. Buckner Thruston
  8. James Dunlop
  9. William Matthew Merrick
  10. Richard Henry Alvey
  11. Martin Ferdinand Morris
  12. Seth Shepard
  13. Louis Emory McComas
  14. Charles Holland Duell
  15. Charles Henry Robb
  16. Josiah Alexander Van Orsdel
  17. William Hitz
  18. Constantine Joseph Smyth
  19. Duncan Groner
  20. George Ewing Martin
  21. James McPherson Proctor
  22. Harold Montelle Stephens
  23. Henry Edgerton
  24. Justin Miller
  25. James Wright
  26. Walter Bastian
  27. Edward Tamm
  28. Spottswood Robinson
  29. Thurman Arnold
  30. Bennett Clark
  31. Wilbur Miller
  32. David Bazelon
  33. Robert Bork
  34. John Danaher
  35. Charles Fahy
  36. George MacKinnon
  37. Carl McGowan
  38. Abner Mikva
  39. Elijah Prettyman
  40. Roger Robb
  41. Kenneth Starr
  42. Patricia Wald
  43. George Thomas Washington
  44. Malcolm Wilkey
  45. George Edward MacKinnon
  46. James Proctor



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