United States District Court for the Eastern District of Texas

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Eastern District of Texas
Fifth Circuit
TX-ED.jpeg
Judges: 6
Posts: 8
Vacancies: 2
Active judges
Chief: Leonard Davis
Senior Judges
Magistrate Judges
Former Judges
Key:
(Numbers indicate % of seats vacant.)
0%0%-10%
10%-25%25%-40%
More than 40%

The United States District Court for the Eastern District of Texas is one of ninety-four United States district courts. The court's headquarters are in Tyler, Texas. When decisions of the court are appealed, they are appealed to the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals based in downtown New Orleans at the John Minor Wisdom Federal Courthouse.

The United States Attorney for the Eastern District of Texas represents the United States in civil and criminal litigation in the court. The current district attorney is John Malcolm Bales.[1]

Vacancy warning level

The United States District Court for the Eastern District of Texas's vacancy warning level is yellow. The court currently has two vacancies out of their eight posts, constituting 25% of their seats.

Pending nominations

JudgeConfirmationBachelorsLaw
Amos MazzantUniversity of Pittsburgh, 1987Baylor Law, 1990
Robert William Schroeder IIIUniversity of Arkansas at Little Rock, 1989American U. Law, 1994


Active judges

Article III judges

JudgeBornHomeAppointed byActiveChiefPreceededBachelorsLaw
Judge Ron Clark1953Caripito, VenezuelaW. Bush 10/10/2002- PresentHowell CobbUniversity of Connecticut, B.A., 1973University of Texas, J.D., 1979
Judge Marcia Crone1952Dallas, TXW. Bush 10/3/2003 - PresentNew Seat|116 Stat. 1758University of Texas, B.A., 1973University of Houston Law Center, J.D., 1978
Chief judge Leonard Davis1948Fort Worth, TexasW. Bush 5/10/2002-5/20152012-2015Paul N. BrownUniversity of Texas, B.A., 1970Baylor U. School of Law, J.D., 1976
Judge Richard Schell1950Dallas, TXReagan 6/6/1988 - Present1994 - 2001William StegerSouthern Methodist U., B.A., 1972Southern Methodist U., J.D., 1975
Judge Michael Schneider1943San Antonio, TXW. Bush 9/10/2004 - PresentJohn H. HannahLon Morris College, A.A.; 1963; Stephen F. Austin State U., B.S., 1965University of Houston Law School, J.D.; 1970 U. of Virginia Law School, LL.M., 2001
Judge James Gilstrap1957Pensacola, FLObama 12/6/2011 - PresentThad HeartfieldBaylor University, B.A., 1978Baylor University School of Law, J.D., 1981


Senior judges

JudgeAppointed byActiveChiefSeniorBachelorsLaw
Senior Judge Thad HeartfieldClinton 3/17/1995 - 1/1/20102003 - 20091/1/2010 - PresentSt. Mary`s University, B.A., 1962St. Mary`s University School of Law, J.D., 1965


Magistrate judges

JudgeActiveBachelorsLaw
Magistrate Judge Amos Mazzant01/09/2009-PresentUniversity of Pittsburgh, 1987Baylor Law, 1990
Magistrate Judge Don Bush
Magistrate Judge Caroline Craven
Magistrate Judge Keith Giblin10/01/2004 - Present
Magistrate Judge John Love01/20/2006 - PresentTexas A&M UniversitySt. Mary's University of San Antonio
Magistrate Judge Zack Hawthorn
Magistrate Judge Roy Payne
Magistrate Judge Katie Nicole Mitchell8/2013-PresentBaylor University, 2006


Jurisdiction

The Counties of the Eastern District of Texas (click for larger map)

The Eastern District of Texas has original jurisdiction over cases filed within its jurisdiction. These cases can include civil and criminal matters that fall under federal law.

There are six court divisions, each covering the following counties:

The Beaumont Division, covering Hardin, Jasper, Jefferson, Liberty, Newton and Orange counties.

The Lufkin Division, covering Angelina, Houston, Nacogdoches, Polk, Sabine, Shelby, San Augustine, Trinity and Tyler counties.

The Marshall Division, covering Camp, Cass, Harrison, Marion, Morris and Upshur counties.

The Sherman Division, covering Collin, Cooke, Denton, Grayson, Delta, Fannin, Hopkins and Lamar counties.

The Texarkana Division, covering Bowie, Franklin, Titus and Red River counties.

The Tyler Division, covering Anderson, Cherokee, Gregg, Henderson, Panola, Rains, Rusk, Smith, Van Zandt and Wood counties.

Caseloads

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Federal Court Caseload Statistics*
YearStarting case load:Cases filed:Total cases:Cases terminated:Remaining cases:Median time(Criminal)**:Median time(Civil)**:3 Year Civil cases#:Vacant posts:## Trials/Post
2013 52685061103294892 543712.98.9202 (5.5%)2420
2012 4644469693404081 525911.510.1150 (4.2%)20.615
2011 4430441388434206 463711.48.6166 (5.1%)1216
2010 4018418482023767 44359.89.6141 (4.6%)8.922
2009 3754425980133995 40189.910.8116 (4.0%)022
2008 3840408079204165 37559.59.276 (2.9%)024
2007307944087487398235058.7941 (1.5%)018
*All statistics are taken from the Official Federal Courts' Website and reflect the calendar year through September.    **Time in months from filing to completion.
#This statistic includes cases which have been appealed in higher courts.    ##This is the total number of months that any judicial posts had spent vacant that year.

Notable cases

For a searchable list of opinions, please see Justia.com-Dockets and Filings-Eastern District of Texas.

History

On December 29, 1845, the State of Texas was organized as one judicial district. One judgeship was authorized for this U.S. district court, and being that it was not assigned to a judicial circuit, the district court was granted the same jurisdiction as the United States circuit courts, excluding appeals and writs of error, which are the jurisdiction of the Supreme Court.

Texas was divided into two judicial districts, known as the Eastern District of Texas and the Western District of Texas, on February 21, 1857. One judgeship was authorized for the court in each district. Circuit court jurisdiction of the district court in Texas was repealed on July 15, 1862, and a U.S. circuit court was established for the district and assigned over to the United States Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit. Texas was then assigned to the United States Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit on July 23, 1866.

The Northern District of Texas was established on February 24, 1879, with one judgeship authorized to the district court. On February 9, 1898, a temporary judgeship was authorized to the Northern District. However, the statute provided that any vacancy in the existing judgeship would not be filled.

A few years later, on March 11, 1902, the Southern District of Texas was established and one judgeship was authorized to this district court.

The Eastern District of Texas had seven judicial posts added over time for a total of eight current posts.[2]

Judicial posts

The following table highlights the development of judicial posts for the Eastern District of Texas:[2]

Year Statute Total Seats
December 29, 1845 9 Stat. 1 1
February 21, 1857 11 Stat. 164 1
February 10, 1954 68 Stat. 8 2
June 2, 1970 84 Stat. 294 3
October 20, 1978 92 Stat. 1629 4
July 10, 1984 98 Stat. 333 6
December 1, 1990 104 Stat. 5089 7
November 2, 2002 116 Stat. 1758 8

Former chief judges

In order to qualify for the office of chief judge in one of the federal courts, a judge must have been in active service on the court for at least one year, be under the age of 65, and have not previously served as chief judge. A vacancy in the office of chief judge is filled by the judge highest in seniority among the group of qualified judges. The chief judge serves for a term of seven years or until age 70, whichever occurs first. The age restrictions are waived if no members of the court would otherwise be qualified for the position. Unlike the Chief Justice of the United States, a chief judge returns to active service after the expiration of his or her term and does not create a vacancy on the bench by the fact of his or her promotion.[3][4]

Former judges

For more information on the judges of the Eastern District of Texas, see former federal judges of the Eastern District of Texas.

Federal courthouse

Six separate courthouses serve the Eastern District of Texas.

See also

External links

References


TexasUnited States District Court for the Eastern District of TexasUnited States District Court for the Western District of TexasUnited States District Court for the Northern District of TexasUnited States District Court for the Southern District of TexasUnited States bankruptcy court, Eastern District of TexasUnited States bankruptcy court, Western District of TexasUnited States bankruptcy court, Northern District of TexasUnited States bankruptcy court, Southern District of TexasUnited States Court of Appeals for the Fifth CircuitTexas Supreme CourtTexas Court of AppealsTexas Court of Criminal AppealsTexas District CourtsTexas County CourtsTexas County Courts at LawTexas Statutory Probate CourtsTexas Justice of the Peace CourtsTexas Municipal CourtsTexas countiesTexas judicial newsTexas judicial electionsJudicial selection in TexasTexasTemplate.jpg