Appellate Court

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Judgepedia:WikiProject Terms and Definitions

The United States Federal Court System defines "appellate courts" as follows:

This text is quoted verbatim from the original source. Any inconsistencies are attributed to the original source.

[A]n appellate court has the power to review the judgment of a lower court (trial court) or tribunal.[1]

States generally use a similar definition. For instance, the Alaska Court System states that "appellate courts" are:

This text is quoted verbatim from the original source. Any inconsistencies are attributed to the original source.

The court that considers the appeal of a lower court decision. An appellate court can review the decision of the lower court.[2]

The Iowa Judicial Branch states:

This text is quoted verbatim from the original source. Any inconsistencies are attributed to the original source.

A court having authority to hear an appeal.[3]

and Supreme Court of Texas states:

This text is quoted verbatim from the original source. Any inconsistencies are attributed to the original source.

Appellate court means the courts of appeals, the Court of Criminal Appeals, and the Supreme Court.[4]

The term, therefore, refers to both an intermediate "court of appeals" and a "court of last resort" (typically a "supreme court").

Supreme Court

The top appellate court in the United States Federal Court System is the Supreme Court of the United States.

The Supreme Court holds both original and appellate jurisdiction, with its appellate jurisdiction accounting for most of the Court's caseload. The Court's appellate jurisdiction encompasses all cases within the scope of Article III, but is subject to limitation by Act of Congress under the Exceptions Clause in Article III and by the discretion of the Court.[5]

The power of the Supreme Court to consider appeals from state courts, rather than just federal courts, was created by the Judiciary Act of 1789 and upheld early in the Court's history, by its rulings in Martin v. Hunter's Lessee (1816) and Cohens v. Virginia (1821).

Intermediate Circuits

The 94 U.S. judicial districts are organized into 12 regional circuits, each of which has a court of appeals which hears appeals from the district courts located within its circuit, as well as appeals from decisions of federal administrative agencies[6]

Ninth CircuitTenth CircuitNinth CircuitEighth CircuitSeventh CircuitSixth CircuitFifth CircuitEleventh CircuitFourth CircuitThird CircuitSecond CircuitFirst CircuitFirst CircuitUnited States District Court for the U.S. Virgin IslandsUS Court of Appeals and District Court map svg.png

Court of Last Resort

Each of the United States and the District of Columbia has at least one Supreme Court, or Court of Last Resort. Oklahoma and Texas both have two courts of last resort, one for civil appeals and one for criminal appeals.

State Court of Appeals

There are 43 state appellate courts in 40 states.

WashingtonOregonCaliforniaAlaskaIdahoNevadaMontanaWyomingUtahArizonaColoradoNew MexicoNorth DakotaSouth DakotaNebraskaKansasOklahomaTexasMinnesotaIowaMissouriArkansasLouisianaWisconsinIllinoisMississippiMichiganMichiganIndianaOhioKentuckyTennesseeAlabamaNew YorkPennsylvaniaWest VirginiaVirginiaNorth CarolinaGeorgiaSouth CarolinaFloridaMaineVermontD.C.Rhode IslandVermontNew HampshireNew HampshireMassachusettsMassachusettsNew JerseyNew JerseyConnecticutDelawareMarylandHawaiiList of state intermediate appellate courtsIntermediate appellate courts map.png

States without appellate courts

These ten states do not have dedicated intermediate appellate courts:

See also

Appellate courts

Terms and definitions

External links

References