Charles Edward Wiggins

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Charles Edward Wiggins (1927-2000) was a federal judge on the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit. He joined the court in 1984 after being nominated by President Ronald Reagan and served it until his death on March 2, 2000.[1]

Education

  • University of Southern California, B.S., 1953
  • University of Southern California Law School, LL.B, 1956[1]

Professional career

  • U.S. Army First Lieutenant, 1945-1948, 1950-1952
  • Law clerk, Hon. Swain, Appellate Division, Los Angeles Superior Court
  • Private practice, El Monte, California, 1957-1966
  • Member, El Monte Planning Commission, 1954-1960
  • Councilman, El Monte, California, 1960-1964
  • Mayor, El Monte, California, 1964-1966
  • U.S. Representative from California, 1967-1979
  • Private practice, Los Angeles, California, 1979-1982
  • Private practice, Washington, DC, 1982-1984
  • Private practice, San Francisco, California, 1984[1]

Federal judicial career

Wiggins was a was a federal judge on the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit. He joined the court in 1984 after being nominated by President Ronald Reagan on August 1, 1984, to a new seat created by 98 Stat. 333. He was confirmed by the Senate on October 3, 1984 and received his commission on October 11, 1984. Wiggins assumed senior status on December 31, 1996 and continued serving the court in that position until his death on March 2, 2000.[1]

Political ideology

See also: Political ideology of State Supreme Court Justices

In October 2012, political science professors Adam Bonica and Michael Woodruff of Stanford University attempted to determine the partisan ideology of state supreme court justices in their paper, State Supreme Court Ideology and 'New Style' Judicial Campaigns. A score above 0 indicated a more conservative leaning ideology while scores below 0 are more liberal. Wiggins received a Campaign finance score (CFscore) of -1.3, indicating a liberal ideological leaning. This is more liberal than the average CF score of -0.91 that justices received in Washington. The study is based on data from campaign contributions by judges themselves, the partisan leaning of contributors to the judges or, in the absence of elections, the ideology of the appointing body (governor or legislature). This study is not a definitive label of a justice, but an academic gauge of various factors.[2]

References

Federal judicial offices
Preceded by:
NA - new seat
Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals
1984–2000
Succeeded by:
Carlos Bea