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Charles Haight

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Charles Haight
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Current Court Information:
United States District Court for the Southern District of New York
Title:   Senior Judge
Position:   Seat #11
Station:   New Haven, CT
Service:
Appointed by:   Gerald Ford
Active:   03/29/1976 - 09/22/1995
Senior:   09/23/1995 - Present
Preceded by:   Murray Gurfein
Succeeded by:   Richard Casey
Personal History
Born:   1930
Hometown:   New York, NY
Undergraduate:   Yale, B.A., 1952
Law School:   Yale Law, LL.B., 1955

Charles Sherman Haight, Jr. is a federal judge on the United States District Court for the Southern District of New York. He is serving on senior status.[1] He joined the court in 1976 after being nominated by President Gerald Ford.

Education

Haight graduated from Yale with an undergraduate degree in 1952 and Yale Law with a Bachelor of Laws degree in 1955.[1]

Professional career

Haight began his legal career as a trial attorney in the Civil Division of the U.S. Department of Justice from 1955 to 1957 and also served as a private practice attorney in New York City from 1957 to 1976.[1]

Judicial career

Southern District of New York

Haight was nominated by President Gerald Ford on March 2, 1976 to a seat vacated by Murray Gurfein. Haight was confirmed by the Senate on March 26, 1976 and received commission on March 29, 1976. Haight was succeeded in this position by Richard Casey. Haight later assumed senior status on September 23, 1995.[1]

Notable cases

Wrongfully imprisoned man freed after 18 years (2013)

     United States District Court for the Southern District of New York (Lewis v. Commissioner of Correction, 3:03-CV-196 (CSH))

On December 16, 2013, Haight ordered that Scott Lewis, a Connecticut man imprisoned after a double homicide conviction in 1995, be freed within 60 days unless the state should decide to retry him. Lewis pressed his innocence from the time of his arrest and throughout nearly two decades spent in prison, working feverishly to win his freedom despite his 120-year sentence. He represented himself without an attorney for 14 years before Professor Brett Dignam of the Columbia Law School's Mass Incarceration Clinic stepped in to assist with his case. Based on information from prior court proceedings -- including two state court habeas petitions, FBI intervention and investigation, and a federal court habeas petition -- Haight, in examining whether Lewis received a fair trial and without commenting on his innocence, determined that Lewis was "entitled to federal habeas relief because the state suppressed exculpatory and impeachment evidence" (i.e., the state withheld evidence that a key witness had been coached by police and that a police informant who died before trial notified authorities that another man committed the crime). A representative from the Connecticut state attorney's office noted that the case was under review following Haight's ruling.[2][3][4]

See also

External links

References

Federal judicial offices
Preceded by:
Murray Gurfein
Southern District of New York
1976–1995
Succeeded by:
Richard Casey


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