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David Carter

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David Carter
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Current Court Information:
United States District Court for the Central District of California
Title:   Judge
Position:   Seat #16
Service:
Appointed by:   Bill Clinton
Active:   10/22/1998 - Present
Preceded by:   William Rea
Personal History
Born:   1944
Hometown:   Providence, RI
Undergraduate:   University of California, Los Angeles, B.A., 1967
Law School:   University of California, Los Angeles, School of Law, J.D., 1972

David Carter is a federal judge for the United States District Court for the Central District of California. He joined the court in 1998 after being nominated by President Bill Clinton.[1]

Early life and education

Born in Providence, Rhode Island, Carter graduated from the University of California Los Angeles with his bachelor's degree in 1967 and obtained his Juris Doctor in 1972.[1]

Professional career

Carter was elected District Attorney for Orange County, California from 1972 to 1981. Carter served as a Municipal Court Judge for the Orange County Municipal Court, Western Division from 1981 to 1982, also serving for the Eastern Division of the Court in 1982. From 1982 to 1998, Carter was Superior Court Judge in the Ballotpedia:Orange County, California California Superior Court.[1]

Judicial career

Central District of California

On the recommendation of U.S. Senators Dianne Feinstien and Barbara Boxer, Carter was nominated to the United States District Court for the Central District of California by President Bill Clinton on June 25, 1998, to a seat vacated by William Rea as Rea died in judicial service. Carter was confirmed by the United States Senate on October 21, 1998 on a Senate vote and received commission on October 22, 1998.[2]

Notable cases

Brookstreet Securities fined $10M (2012)

     United States District Court for the Central District of California (Securities and Exchange Commission v. Brookstreet Securities Corp et al, 8:09-cv-01431-DOC-AN)

On February 22, 2012, Judge David Carter of the United States District Court for the Central District of California fined the former CEO of Brookstreet Securities Corporation $10 million dollars for alleged civil fraud. Stanley Brooks, the founder, president and CEO of the securities company was ordered to pay $110,713 in restitution and interest. He was further ordered to refrain from future violations of securities laws. Brooks was accused of selling risky mortgage securities to unsophisticated retail investors prior to the collapse of the housing market. Brooks was charged in 2009, in one of the early cases brought by the SEC following the housing market collapse. Ten Brookstreet brokers were also sued by the SEC for misrepresentation to investors.[3]

Medical Capital Holdings (2009)

     U.S. District Court for the Central District of California (Securities and Exchange Commission v. Medical Capital Holdings Inc et al, 8:09-cv-00818-DOC-RNB)

On July 20, 2009, Judge Carter barred Medical Capital Holdings Inc. from selling additional securities in an offering that raised at least $76.9 million. The ruling was in response to a complaint alleging fraud against the company filed by the Securities and Exchange Commission.[4] Judge Carter also froze the assets the company and its subsidiaries and appointed a temporary receiver to oversee the firm. The SEC filed a complaint on July 16, 2009, alleging that the financial services company committed fraud as far back to 2003. The SEC complaint also alleged that the company lied to shareholders over not reporting $1.2 billion in notes outstanding and $992.5 million in notes that went into default.[4]

California Prop 8 case (2009)

     U.S. District Court for the Central District of California (Arthur Smelt et al v. United States of America et al, 8:09-cv-00286-DOC-MLG)

On July 17, 2009, Judge Carter threw out a lawsuit involving Proposition 8 on a federal constitutional challenge.[5]

A homosexual couple sued the State of California claiming the 2008 ballot measure violated the Defense of Marriage Act of 1996.[5]

The judge's ruling found the plaintiffs were legally married before the enactment of Proposition 8. Because the California Supreme Court in May of 2009 ruled that their marriage would be upheld, there was no "injury" caused by the measure.[5]

See also

External links

References

Federal judicial offices
Preceded by:
William Rea
Central District of California
1998–Current
Seat #16
Succeeded by:
NA


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