James Iredell

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James Iredell
JamesIredell.jpg
Current Court Information:
Supreme Court of the United States
Title:   Former Justice
Position:   Seat #6t
Service:
Appointed by:   George Washington
Active:   2/10/1790 - 10/20/1799
Preceded by:   New Seat
Succeeded by:   Alfred Moore
Personal History
Born:   October 5, 1751
Hometown:   Lewes, England
Deceased:   October 20, 1799
Law School:   Read law, 1770



James Iredell was an Associate Justice on the Supreme Court of the United States. He joined the court in 1790 after following a nomination from George Washington. Iredell served on the Supreme Court until his death on October 20, 1799. Prior to joining the court, he was a private practice attorney in North Carolina.[1]

Iredell was one of eight justices nominated to the Supreme Court by President Washington. He served during The Jay Court, The Rutledge Court and The Ellsworth Court.[2]

Education

Iredell received his legal training by reading law.[1]

Professional career

  • 1779-1781: North Carolina Attorney General
  • 1977: Judge, Superior Court of North Carolina
  • 1776: Member, Commission to draft and revise the laws of North Carolina
  • 1774-1776: Collector of customs, Port Roanoke, North Carolina
  • 1773-1790: Attorney in private practice, Edenton, North Carolina
  • 1768-1774: Comptroller of customs, Edenton, North Carolina

[1]

Judicial career

Supreme Court of the United States

Iredell was nominated by President George Washington on February 8, 1790 to a new seat established by 1 Stat. 73. He was confirmed by the Senate on February 10, 1790, and received commission that same day. He served until his death on October 20, 1799.[1] He was succeeded to this post by Justice Alfred Moore.

See also

External links

  • James Iredell. Biography from "michaelariens.com" (Michael Ariens is a Professor of Law)

References

Federal judicial offices
Preceded by:
NA - new seat
Supreme Court
1790–1799
Seat #6t
Succeeded by:
Alfred Moore
This judge was assigned the seat number 6t or 6 temporary not because it was designed to be a temporary post but because the seat was allowed to expire by the congress in 1867.