Intermediate appellate courts

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Portal:Intermediate appellate courts in the states

The intermediate appellate courts, like their name suggests, serve as an intermediate step between the trial courts and the courts of last resort in a state. Forty out of the fifty states have at least one intermediate appellate court. Their jurisdiction varies from state to state, but in most cases they serve to relieve the workload of the state's highest court.[1]

Some states have more than one of these types of courts, such as Alabama, which has one intermediate appellate court for civil matters and another for criminal. Pennsylvania's superior court and a commonwealth court are both appellate courts but have different jurisdictions. Other states, such as Illinois and California, have multiple divisions with varying degrees of independence from each other.

List of state intermediate appellate courts

Court Established Number of judges Method of selection Term length
Alabama Court of Civil Appeals 1969 5 Partisan election of judges 6 years
Alabama Court of Criminal Appeals 1969 5 Partisan election of judges 6 years
Alaska Court of Appeals 1980 3 Commission-selection, political appointment 8 years
Arizona Court of Appeals 1965 22 Commission-selection, political appointment 6 years
Arkansas Court of Appeals 1978 12 Non-partisan election of judges 8 years
California Fifth District Court of Appeal 1905 10 Gubernatorial appointment 12 years
California First District Court of Appeal 1905 20 Gubernatorial appointment 12 years
California Fourth District Court of Appeal 1905 25 Gubernatorial appointment 12 years
California Second District Court of Appeal 1905 32 Gubernatorial appointment 12 years
California Sixth District Court of Appeal 1905 7 Gubernatorial appointment 12 years
California Third District Court of Appeal 1905 10 Gubernatorial appointment 12 years
Colorado Court of Appeals 1891, 1970[2] 22 Commission-selection, political appointment 8 years
Connecticut Appellate Court 1982 9 Commission-selection, political appointment with legislative confirmation 8 years
Florida Fifth District Court of Appeal 1957 10 Commission-selection, political appointment 6 years
Florida First District Court of Appeal 1957 15 Commission-selection, political appointment 6 years
Florida Fourth District Court of Appeal 1957 12 Commission-selection, political appointment 6 years
Florida Second District Court of Appeal 1957 14 Commission-selection, political appointment 6 years
Florida Third District Court of Appeal 1957 10 Commission-selection, political appointment 6 years
Georgia Court of Appeals 1906 12 Non-partisan election of judges 6 years
Hawaii Intermediate Court of Appeals 1959 6 Commission-selection, political appointment with Senate confirmation 10 years
Idaho Court of Appeals 1980 4 Non-partisan election of judges 6 years
Illinois Fifth District Appellate Court 1964[3] 7 Partisan election of judges 10 years
Illinois First District Appellate Court 1877 23 Partisan election of judges 10 years
Illinois Fourth District Appellate Court 1877[4] 7 Partisan election of judges 10 years
Illinois Second District Appellate Court 1877[5] 9 Partisan election of judges 10 years
Illinois Third District Appellate Court 1877[6] 7 Partisan election of judges 10 years
Indiana Court of Appeals 1891 15 Commission-selection, political appointment 10 years
Iowa Court of Appeals 9 Commission-selection, political appointment 6 years
Kansas Court of Appeals 13 Commission-selection, political appointment 4 years
Kentucky Court of Appeals 14 Partisan election of judges 8 years
Louisiana Fifth Circuit Court of Appeal 1981 8 Partisan election of judges 10 years
Louisiana First Circuit Court of Appeal 1981 12 Partisan election of judges 10 years
Louisiana Fourth Circuit Court of Appeal 1981 12 Partisan election of judges 10 years
Louisiana Second Circuit Court of Appeal 1981 9 Partisan election of judges 10 years
Louisiana Third Circuit Court of Appeal 1981 12 Partisan election of judges 10 years
Maryland Court of Special Appeals 1966 13 Commission-selection, political appointment with Senate confirmation 10 years
Massachusetts Appeals Court 25 Gubernatorial appointment with confirmation Until age 70
Michigan Court of Appeals 1963 28 Non-partisan election of judges 6 years
Minnesota Court of Appeals 1983 19 Non-partisan election of judges 6 years
Mississippi Court of Appeals 1995 9 Non-partisan election of judges 8 years
Missouri Court of Appeals 31 Commission-selection, political appointment 12 years
Nebraska Court of Appeals 1991 6 Commission-selection, political appointment 6 years
New Jersey Superior Court, Appellate Division 34 Gubernatorial appointment with Senate confirmation 7 years
New Mexico Court of Appeals 10 Partisan election of judges 8 years
New York Supreme Court, Appellate Division 60 Commission-selection, political appointment 5 years, or end of
supreme court term
North Carolina Court of Appeals 15 Non-partisan election of judges 8 years
North Dakota Court of Appeals 1987 3 Temporarily appointed in panels Up to 1 year
Ohio Eighth District Court of Appeals 10 Non-partisan election of judges 6 years
Ohio Eleventh District Court of Appeals 5 Non-partisan election of judges 6 years
Ohio Fifth District Court of Appeals 6 Non-partisan election of judges 6 years
Ohio First District Court of Appeals 6 Non-partisan election of judges 6 years
Ohio Fourth District Court of Appeals 4 Non-partisan election of judges 6 years
Ohio Ninth District Court of Appeals 5 Non-partisan election of judges 6 years
Ohio Second District Court of Appeals 5 Non-partisan election of judges 6 years
Ohio Seventh District Court of Appeals 4 Non-partisan election of judges 6 years
Ohio Sixth District Court of Appeals 6 Non-partisan election of judges 6 years
Ohio Tenth District Court of Appeals 8 Non-partisan election of judges 6 years
Ohio Third District Court of Appeals 4 Non-partisan election of judges 6 years
Ohio Twelfth District Court of Appeals 5 Non-partisan election of judges 6 years
Oklahoma Court of Civil Appeals 12 Commission-selection, political appointment 6 years
Oregon Court of Appeals 10 Non-partisan election of judges 6 years
Pennsylvania Commonwealth Court 1968 9 partisan election of judges 10 years
Pennsylvania Superior Court 1895 15 partisan election of judges 10 years
South Carolina Court of Appeals 1983 9 Legislative elections 6 years
Tennessee Court of Appeals 1925 12 Commission selection, political appointment 8 years
Tennessee Court of Criminal Appeals 12 Commission selection, political appointment 8 years
Utah Court of Appeals 1987 7 Commission-selection, political appointment 6 years
Virginia Court of Appeals 1985 11 Legislative election of judges 8 years
Washington Court of Appeals 22 Non-partisan election of judges 6 years
Wisconsin Court of Appeals District I 1978 4 Non-partisan election of judges 6 years
Wisconsin Court of Appeals District II 1978 4 Non-partisan election of judges 6 years
Wisconsin Court of Appeals District III 1978 3 Non-partisan election of judges 6 years
Wisconsin Court of Appeals District IV 1978 5 Non-partisan election of judges 6 years

Salaries

State Annual salary of
intermediate appellate
court judges ($)
Alabama 159-199k
Alaska 185,000
Arizona 150,000
Arkansas 141,000
California 207,463
Colorado 134,128
Connecticut 153,000
Florida 150,000
Georgia 166,000
Hawaii 140,000
Idaho 119,000
Illinois 199,000
Indiana 155,000[7]
Iowa 148,000
Kansas 132,000
Kentucky 130,000
Louisiana 144,000
Maryland 153,000
Massachusetts 135,000
Michigan 151,000
Minnesota 138,000
Mississippi 115,000
Missouri 128,000
Nebraska 136,000
New Jersey 176,000
New Mexico 118,000
New York 167,000
North Carolina 134,440
Ohio 132,000
Oklahoma 130,000
Oregon 123,000
Pennsylvania 188,337
South Carolina 134,000
Tennessee 168,000
Texas 138-145k
Utah 139,000
Virginia 168,000
Washington 156,000
Wisconsin 136,000

States without intermediate appellate courts

The following states do not have an intermediate appellate court:

The District of Columbia also does not have such a court.

WashingtonOregonCaliforniaAlaskaIdahoNevadaMontanaWyomingUtahArizonaColoradoNew MexicoNorth DakotaSouth DakotaNebraskaKansasOklahomaTexasMinnesotaIowaMissouriArkansasLouisianaWisconsinIllinoisMississippiMichiganMichiganIndianaOhioKentuckyTennesseeAlabamaNew YorkPennsylvaniaWest VirginiaVirginiaNorth CarolinaGeorgiaSouth CarolinaFloridaMaineVermontD.C.Rhode IslandVermontNew HampshireNew HampshireMassachusettsMassachusettsNew JerseyNew JerseyConnecticutDelawareMarylandHawaiiList of state intermediate appellate courtsIntermediate appellate courts map.png

See also

External links

References

  1. State Justice Institute, "The Role of State Intermediate Appellate Courts," November 2012
  2. The Colorado Court of Appeals was first established in 1891, but was abolished and re-established up to 1970, when it was established in its current form.
  3. Four Illinois appellate court districts were founded in 1877, but they were reorganized into five districts in 1964. See: Nineteenth Judicial Circuit Court, "History of the Illinois Courts," accessed July 8, 2014
  4. Four Illinois appellate court districts were founded in 1877, but they were reorganized into five districts in 1964. See: Nineteenth Judicial Circuit Court, "History of the Illinois Courts," accessed July 8, 2014
  5. Four Illinois appellate court districts were founded in 1877, but they were reorganized into five districts in 1964. See: Nineteenth Judicial Circuit Court, "History of the Illinois Courts," accessed July 8, 2014
  6. Four Illinois appellate court districts were founded in 1877, but they were reorganized into five districts in 1964. See: Nineteenth Judicial Circuit Court, "History of the Illinois Courts," accessed July 8, 2014
  7. Includes a $3k "subsistence" fee
  8. *The Superior Court of Delaware acts as both a trial and intermediate appellate court.