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Milton Tingling

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Milton A. Tingling
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Current Court Information:
New York County Supreme Court, New York
Position:   Supreme Court Justice
Service:
Active:   2001-2014
Past position:   Judge, New York City Civil Court
Past term:   1996-2000
Personal History
Undergraduate:   Brown University, 1975
Law School:   North Carolina Central University School of Law, 1982
Candidate 2014:
Candidate for:  Supreme Court, 1st District
Position:  Seats 1-2
State:  New York
Election information 2014:
Party:   Democratic
Incumbent:  Yes
Election date:  11/4/2014

Milton A. Tingling, Jr. is a justice for the New York County Supreme Court, Civil Term in the 1st Judicial District of New York. He was elected to this position in 2001. He is running for re-election in 2014.[1][2][3]

Elections

2014

See also: New York judicial elections, 2014
Tingling is running for re-election to the Supreme Court, 1st District.
General: He will be unopposed in the general election on November 4, 2014.[3]
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Education

Tingling received his B.A. degree from Brown University in 1975 and his J.D. degree from North Carolina Central University School of Law in 1982.[1]

Career

Before serving as a judge, Tingling worked as a law assistant to Civil Court Judge Milton Richardson, a law secretary to Acting Supreme Court and Court of Claims Judge Dennis Edwards, a sole practitioner working in New York City and a court attorney for the Trial Part of the Civil Court, working for Hon. Wilfred O'Connor. His career on the bench began in 1996, when he was appointed to the New York City Civil Court. He served on the civil court until 2000 and he was elected to the Supreme Court in 2001.[1]

Notable cases

Judge stops NYC soda ban


On March 11, 2013, Judge Milton Tingling shot down a New York City soda ban supported by Mayor Bloomberg and the New York City Department of Health. The new law would have stopped restaurants and other such venues from selling sugary drinks over 16 ounces.

In his ruling, Tingling prohibited the city from "implementing or enforcing the new regulations" and turned the matter over to the New York State Legislature, stating that the Mayor and Department of Health did not have the authority to create such rules.[4]

Tingling wrote,

The rule would not only violate the separation of powers doctrine, it would eviscerate it...Such an evisceration has the potential to be more troubling than sugar sweetened drinks.[4][5]

He also explained,

It is arbitrary and capricious because it applies to some but not all food establishments in the city, it excludes other beverages that have significantly higher concentrations of sugar sweeteners and/or calories on suspect grounds, and the loopholes inherent in the rule, including but not limited to no limitations on refills, defeat and/or serve to gut the purpose of the rule.[4][5]

To read the full case decision, click here

The Appellate Division's First Department upheld Tingling's ruling in July 2013.[6]

See also

External links

References

New YorkUnited States District Court for the Eastern District of New YorkUnited States District Court for the Western District of New YorkUnited States District Court for the Northern District of New YorkUnited States District Court for the Southern District of New YorkUnited States bankruptcy court, Eastern District of New YorkUnited States bankruptcy court, Western District of New YorkUnited States bankruptcy court, Northern District of New YorkUnited States bankruptcy court, Southern District of New YorkUnited States Court of Appeals for the Second CircuitNew York Court of AppealsNew York Supreme Court, Appellate DivisionNew York Supreme CourtNew York County CourtsNew York City CourtsNew York Town and Village CourtsNew York Family CourtsNew York Surrogates' CourtsNew York City Civil CourtNew York City Criminal CourtsNew York Court of ClaimsNew York Problem Solving CourtsNew York countiesNew York judicial newsNew York judicial electionsJudicial selection in New YorkNewYorkTemplate.jpg