Robert Parker

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Robert Parker
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Current Court Information:
United States Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit
Title:   Former Chief Judge
Service:
Appointed by:   Bill Clinton
Active:   6/16/1994 - 11/1/2002
Preceded by:   Samuel Johnson
Past post:   Eastern District of Texas
Past chief:   1990 - 1994
Past term:   4/26/1979 - 6/17/1994
Past position:   Seat #4
Personal History
Born:   1937
Hometown:   Longview, TX
Undergraduate:   U. of Texas, Austin, B.B.A., 1961
Law School:   U. of Texas School of Law, LL.B., 1964



Robert Manley Parker (b. 1937) was a judge on the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Texas and the United States Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit.

Early life and education

  • University of Texas, Austin, B.B.A., 1961
  • University of Texas School of Law, LL.B., 1964[1]

Professional career

  • Private practice, Gilmer, Texas, 1964-1965
  • Private practice, Longview, Texas, 1965
  • Administrative assistant to U.S. Rep. Ray Roberts, 1965-1966
  • Private practice, Longview, Texas, 1966-1971
  • Private practice, Fort Worth, Texas, 1971-1972
  • Private practice, Longview, Texas, 1972-1979[1]

Judicial career

Fifth Circuit

Parker joined the United States Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit on June 16, 1994 after being nominated by President Bill Clinton, filling a seat vacated by Samuel Johnson.[1]

Eastern District of Texas

Parker joined the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Texas on April 26, 1979 after being nominated by President Jimmy Carter. The seat that Parker took on the Eastern District Court was a new seat created by 92 Stat. 1629. Parker was succeeded in this position by Thad Heartfield.

External links

References

Federal judicial offices
Preceded by:
NA - new seat
Eastern District of Texas
1979–1994
Seat #4
Succeeded by:
Thad Heartfield
Preceded by:
Samuel Johnson
Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals
1994–2002
Succeeded by:
Edward Prado