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United States District Court for the Western District of North Carolina

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Western District of North Carolina
Fourth Circuit
NC-WD.gif
Judges: 5
Posts: 5
Vacancies: 0
Active judges
Chief: Frank Whitney
Senior Judges
Magistrate Judges
Former Judges
Key:
(Numbers indicate % of seats vacant.)
0%0%-10%
10%-25%25%-40%
More than 40%

The United States District Court for the Western District of North Carolina is one of ninety-four United States district courts. When decisions of the court are appealed, they are appealed to the Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals based in downtown Richmond, Virginia, at the Lewis F. Powell Federal Courthouse.

The United States Attorney for the Western District of North Carolina represents the United States in civil and criminal litigation in the court. The current district attorney is Anne Tompkins.[1]

Vacancy warning level

The United States District Court for the Western District of North Carolina's vacancy warning level is green. The court currently has no vacancies.

Pending nominations

There are no pending nominations for the United States District Court for the Western District of North Carolina.


Active judges

Article III judges

JudgeBornHomeAppointed byActiveChiefPreceededBachelorsLaw
Judge Robert Conrad1958Chicago, ILW. Bush 06/02/2005 - Present2006 - 6/2/2013New Seat|116 Stat. 1758Clemson U., B.A., 1980University of Virginia Law, J.D., 1983
Chief Judge Frank Whitney1959Charlotte, NCW. Bush 06/05/2006 - Present6/2/2013 - PresentBrent McKnightWake Forest U., B.A., 1982University of North Carolina Law, J.D., 1987
Judge Richard Voorhees1941Syracuse, NYReagan 10/17/1988 - Present1991 - 1998David SentelleDavidson College, B.A., 1963University of North Carolina Law, J.D., 1968
Judge Martin Reidinger1958New Haven, CTW. Bush 09/12/2007 - PresentGraham MullenUniversity of North Carolina, B.A., 1981University of North Carolina Law, J.D., 1984
Judge Max O. Cogburn, Jr.1951Cambridge, MAObama 3/10/2011-PresentLacy ThornburgUniversity of North Carolina, B.A., 1973Samford U. Cumberland Law, J.D., 1976


Senior judges

JudgeAppointed byActiveChiefSeniorBachelorsLaw
Senior Judge Graham MullenH.W. Bush 09/11/1990 - 11/30/20051998 - 200512/01/2005 - PresentDuke U., B.A., 1962Duke U. Law, J.D., 1969


Magistrate judges

JudgeActiveBachelorsLaw
Magistrate Judge David Kessler04/30/2004 - PresentUniversity of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 1984University of Virginia Law, J.D., 1987
Magistrate Judge Dennis Howell10/05/2004 - Present
Magistrate Judge David Cayer04/02/2009 - Present


Jurisdiction

The Counties of the Western District of North Carolina (click for larger map)

The Western District of North Carolina has original jurisdiction over cases filed within its jurisdiction. These cases can include civil and criminal matters that fall under federal law.

The geographic jurisdiction of the Western District of North Carolina consists of all the following counties in the western part of the state of North Carolina.

There are four court divisions, each covering the following counties:

The Asheville Division, covering Avery, Buncombe, Burke, Cleveland, Haywood, Henderson, Madison, McDowell, Mitchell, Polk, Rutherford, Transylvania, and Yancey Counties

The Bryson Division, covering Cherokee, Clay, Graham, Jackson, Macon, and Swain Counties

The Charlotte Division, covering Anson, Gaston, Mecklenburg, and Union Counties

The Statesville Division, covering Alexander, Alleghany, Ashe, Caldwell, and Catawba, Iredell, Lincoln, Watauga, and Wilkes Counties

Caseloads

pChart

pChart

Federal Court Caseload Statistics*
YearStarting case load:Cases filed:Total cases:Cases terminated:Remaining cases:Median time(Criminal)**:Median time(Civil)**:3 Year Civil cases#:Vacant posts:## Trials/Post
2013 2202227444762312 216415.68.334 (2.9%)024
2012 1774239141651960 220513.38.431 (2.4%)021
2011 1540206336031863 174013.17.938 (3.6%)5.221
2010 1504175432581710 154813.57.638 (4.2%)1227
2009 1564196135252006 151911.2522 (2.7%)131
2008 1776198537612183 157812.77.642 (4.7%)024
200716591866352522151310147.552 (6.5%)11.333
*All statistics are taken from the Official Federal Courts' Website and reflect the calendar year through September.    **Time in months from filing to completion.
#This statistic includes cases which have been appealed in higher courts.    ##This is the total number of months that any judicial posts had spent vacant that year.

Notable cases

History

The District of North Carolina was established by Congress on June 4, 1790, with one post to cover the entire state. On June 4, 1872, Congress divided the district into the Eastern District of North Carolina and the Western District of North Carolina with one post for each district. On March 2, 1927, Congress split the Middle District of North Carolina off from the existing districts. Over time, Congress added four posts to the Western District of North Carolina to reach the current total of five posts.[5]

Judicial posts

The following table highlights the development of judicial posts for the Western District of North Carolina:[5]

Year Statute Total Seats
June 4, 1790 1 Stat. 126 1 (Whole state)
June 4, 1872 17 Stat. 215 1
May 19, 1961 75 Stat. 80 2
October 20, 1978 92 Stat. 1629 3
November 2, 2002 116 Stat. 1758 5(1 Temporary)

Former chief judges

In order to qualify for the office of chief judge in one of the federal courts, a judge must have been in active service on the court for at least one year, be under the age of 65, and have not previously served as chief judge. A vacancy in the office of chief judge is filled by the judge highest in seniority among the group of qualified judges. The chief judge serves for a term of seven years or until age 70, whichever occurs first. The age restrictions are waived if no members of the court would otherwise be qualified for the position. Unlike the Chief Justice of the United States, a chief judge returns to active service after the expiration of his or her term and does not create a vacancy on the bench by the fact of his or her promotion.[6][7]

Former judges

For more information on the judges of the Western District of North Carolina, see former federal judge of the Western District of North Carolina.

Federal courthouse

There are four federal courthouses that serve the Western District of North Carolina.

See also

External links

References


North CarolinaSupreme Court of North CarolinaNorth Carolina Court of AppealsNorth Carolina Superior CourtsNorth Carolina District CourtsUnited States District Court for the Eastern District of North CarolinaUnited States District Court for the Middle District of North CarolinaUnited States District Court for the Western District of North CarolinaUnited States Court of Appeals for the Fourth CircuitNorth Carolina countiesNorth Carolina judicial newsNorth Carolina judicial electionsJudicial selection in North CarolinaNorthCarolinaTemplatewithoutBankruptcy.jpg